Ford Fiesta Engine Management Light On

2014 Ford Fiesta Problem

Ref#21120
CarFord Fiesta 1L Eco-Booster
Year2014
OwnerJohn456
Posted17/09/2018
Ads by Google
The engine management light is on. When tested, comes up with a message 'Bank 1 Oxygen Sensor' . But it is not the oxygen sensor. Engine runs fine. What is the next step to take.
Problem Category
Electrics, ECU, Warnings & Lights


Solution 1
whittingehame | Legend | Since: Oct 2009 | Posts: 444 | Fixes: 11795 | View Garage
Suggested Solution

How do you know it's not the sensor ? The sensor can get dirty / fouled up and throw a code especially if car used for short journeys .I would replace after checking connection / wiring o.k .


Posted on Monday 17th of September 2018
Don't understand this? Ask a question
Solution 2
1/4drive | Auto Insider | Since: Jun 2011 | Posts: 25 | Fixes: 1830 | View Garage
Suggested Solution

That's not a ""P" code,
who's doing the diagnostics?
Anyway any "O" sensor code fault the next step is live data reading of the sensor.


Posted on Monday 17th of September 2018
Don't understand this? Ask a question
Solution 3
whittingehame | Legend | Since: Oct 2009 | Posts: 444 | Fixes: 11795 | View Garage
Suggested Solution

P0130 O2 Sensor Circuit Malfunction (Bank 1, Sensor 1)


Posted on Monday 17th of September 2018
Don't understand this? Ask a question
Solution 4
1/4drive | Auto Insider | Since: Jun 2011 | Posts: 25 | Fixes: 1830 | View Garage
Suggested Solution

circuit malfunction doesn't mean sensor malfunction.


Posted on Tuesday 18th of September 2018
Don't understand this? Ask a question
Solution 5
whittingehame | Legend | Since: Oct 2009 | Posts: 444 | Fixes: 11795 | View Garage
Suggested Solution

Causes:
Common causes include:
- Faulty air fuel ratio (A/F) sensor also known as front oxygen sensor or Bank 1 Sensor 1

Code P0135 - Heated Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction (Bank1 Sensor1)
The air/fuel ratio (A/F) sensor also known as a front oxygen sensor (Bank 1 Sensor1) is installed in the exhaust before the catalytic converter. The sensor is heated by an electric heating element built inside the sensor. This is needed to quickly warm up the sensor to normal operating temperature when the car is started. The code P0135 means there is a malfunction in the A/F sensor heater circuit. Read more about the A/F sensor.
• Symptoms
• Causes
• Diagnostic
• Common problems causing the code P0135
• Sample step-by-step code P0135 diagnostics
Symptoms:
In most cases, there is no symptoms other than the Check Engine Light. Often the Check engine light may come on after the vehicle has been started cold.

Causes:
Common causes include:
- Faulty air fuel ratio (A/F) sensor also known as front oxygen sensor or Bank 1 Sensor 1
- Corrosion or damaged terminal at the A/F sensor connector
- Damaged or shorted wiring between the sensor and the PCM or between the sensor and the fuse box.
- Blown or missing fuse for the sensor heater circuit
- Aftermarket or incorrect air fuel ratio sensor is installed
- Low battery charge.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW
How the code P0135 is diagnosed:
The code P0135 is a pure electric code and is easy to diagnose using a multimeter. In many cars, the battery voltage is supplied through a fuse and relay to the sensor heating element. The ground for the heating element comes from the PCM. A typical diagnostic procedure involves checking the sensor heater fuse, then the relay, then the resistance of the A/F sensor heating element. See the example of step-by-step diagnostic with photos for the code P0135 on the next page. Correct diagnostic procedure can be found in the service manual for your vehicle. We posted several websites that provide access to a service manual for a subscription fee at the bottom of this page.

Here are a few common problems known to cause the code P0135 in different cars:
In some Acura, Honda, Lexus and Toyota vehicles, the failed sensor heating element is known to cause this code. A failed A/F sensor (Bank 1 Sensor 1) can be confirmed by measuring the resistance of the heating element of the sensor.
The resistance should be low, typically between 0.9 and 10 ohms, depending on the vehicle. Specifications for different cars can be found in the service manual. Replacing the sensor often solves the problem.


Posted on Tuesday 18th of September 2018
Don't understand this? Ask a question
Solution 6
1/4drive | Auto Insider | Since: Jun 2011 | Posts: 25 | Fixes: 1830 | View Garage
Suggested Solution

Accurate statement,
But given the vehicle problem and customers shall we say shock at diagnostic charges what I'd do is run the scan tool for codes,Logging them for future reference.
Check the ltft and stft and see if there's a bad reading;
then check the O2 sensor output and frequency,
Determining "IF" there's an actual fault.
Readings fro these quick tests would determine any next step or test.
The O/P states the O2 sensor is fine,
my question is were any of the above tests ran.


Posted on Tuesday 18th of September 2018
Don't understand this? Ask a question
Solution 7
whittingehame | Legend | Since: Oct 2009 | Posts: 444 | Fixes: 11795 | View Garage
Suggested Solution

" The O/P states the O2 sensor is fine, "

Still awaiting an answer to first reply how he knows this .You learn never to take what a customer says as gospel / with a pince of salt .Otherwise you could have a bum steer .I'll drop out now and let you deal with it .


Posted on Tuesday 18th of September 2018
Don't understand this? Ask a question
Ask a Question Post a Solution


More Ford and Fiesta problems

Ford Problems Fiesta Problems

Social Media

Twitter Icon Facebook Icon Google G+ Icon

Car Problems - can you help?


Run an Auto Business?